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Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture Series


Prof. Dr. Yann LeCun - Unsupervised Learning: the Next Frontier in AI


Twice a year, the AICES fellows organize the prestigious Charlemagne Lecture, whose objective is to invite persons, who have achieved impressive accomplishments throughout their career and, in this sense, to get inspired by their scientific achievements.
As the 12th speaker, the AICES fellows invited Professor Dr. Yann LeCun, Director of AI Research at Facebook. Professor Dr. LeCun gave a talk on "Unsupervised Learning: the Next Frontier in AI" on November 28, 2016 at 3pm in the FordHall of Super C (6th floor).


Date: November 28, 2016







Prof. Dr. Ingrid Daubechies - Bones, Teeth and Animation


As the 11th speaker, the AICES fellows invited Professor Dr. Ingrid Daubechies, Professor of Mathematics and Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at Duke University.

Professor Dr. Daubechies gave a talk on "Bones, Teeth and Animation" on October 19, 2015 at 10:30 am in the FordHall of Super C (6th floor).


Date: October 19, 2015






Prof. J. Tinsley Oden - Adaptive Validation and Error Estimation of Coarse-Grained Models of Atomic Systems


As the 10th speaker of the Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture Series the AICES fellows invited Professor J. Tinsley Oden, who is the founding Director of the Institute for Computational Engineering Science at the University of Texas at Austin.

Prof. Professor Oden gave a talk on "Adaptive Validation and Error Estimation of Coarse-Grained Models of Atomic Systems" on April 21, 2015 at 4:00 pm in the Generali Hall of Super C (6th floor).


Date: April 21, 2015






Prof. Dr. Gilbert Strang - Banded Matrices and Fast Inverses


The ninth lecture of the Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture Series was delivered on November 10, 2014 by Gilbert Strang, Professor of Mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Prof. Strang has contributed to the finite element theory, the calculus of variations, wavelet analysis as well as linear algebra.

Lecture information
Date: November 10, 2014






Prof. Dr. Cleve Moler - The Evolution of MATLAB


This semester Cleve Moler, who is currently chairman and chief scientist of MathWorks and the original author of MATLAB, was the 8th speaker of the Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture Series.

Cleve Moler gave a talk on “The Evolution of MATLAB”, in which he elaborated on how MATLAB has evolved over more than 30 years, from a simple matrix calculator to a powerful technical computing environment. It was a considerable success and gave scientists as well as students the opportunity to discuss specific questions about MATLAB and to gain an insight into the past and the future of MathWorks.

Lecture information
Date: June 16, 2014






Prof. Dr. Michele Parrinello - Atomistic Computer Simulations: Past, Present and Future


As the seventh speaker of the Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture Series, the AICES fellows invited Prof. Michele Parrinello, who implemented a technique known as Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics. As a result, he is one of the most cited physicists and chemists of our times.

In the course of his career, he has been manager at the IBM Research Laboratory in Zürich, and Director of the renowned Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart. He is now Professor of Computational Science at the ETH Zürich and the Università della Svizzera Italiana in Lugano.

Professor Parinello´s talk drew a considerable audience and gave scientists the opportunity to get a vision of the past, present and future of atomistic computer simulations.

Lecture information
Date: October 28, 2013






Prof. Dr. Franco Brezzi - Virtual Element Methods


In summer semester 2014, the Italian mathematician Prof. Franco Brezzi was invited to give the Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture Series. Franco Brezzi is Professor of Mathematical Analysis at the Faculty of Engineering of the University of Pavia, and the Director of the Institute of Numerical Analysis of the Italian National Research Council. His research interests are mainly in the field of numerical methods for partial differential equations, and in particular on finite element methods. These include various problems in structural mechanics, fluid mechanics, and electromagnetism.

His major results deal with the stability conditions for problems in mixed form (the inf-sup condition), with the design of new elements for incompressible materials and for plate problems, with the residual-free bubble approach for two-level methods, as well as with the three-field formulation for domain-decomposition methods. Prof. Brezzi´s talk covered the brand new Virtual Element Method. This is a Galerkin method where the finite dimensional subspace is locally comprised of single- or vector-valued functions that are solutions of suitable local PDE problems.

A large audience of researchers and students attended the talk. Again, the AICES fellows seized the opportunity to meet Prof. Brezzi personally, as well as to raise and discuss technical and professional questions.

Lecture information
Date: April 15, 2013






Prof. Dr. Thomas J.R. Hughes - Isogeometric Analysis


The American engineer and mathematician Thomas J.R. Hughes was the speaker of the fifth Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture. Tom Hughes is Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at the University of Texas, Austin. He is distinguished for his fundamental contributions to the development of the Finite Element Method and has pioneered computational methodologies that are widely employed throughout the computational mechanics community. He is among the most highly cited authors in scientific computing and his outstanding contributions to science and society have been recognized by many awards from international institutions and universities.

The topic of Prof. Hughes' talk was Isogeometric Analysis. He summarized mathematical developments in Isogeometric Analysis, a field within Finite Element Analysis, which he pioneered; he also presented examples of applications to problems of solid mechanics, structures and fluid mechanics.

As expected, Prof. Hughes' talk was a striking success and attended by a large audience of more than a hundred researchers and students.

Lecture information
Date: October 24, 2012







Prof. Dr. Pierre-Louis Lions - An Introduction to Mean Field Games


Within the framework of the Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture Series, the French mathematician Pierre-Louis Lions delivered a lecture to the AICES fellows. Prof. Lions is definitely one of the most influential voices in mathematics of our time: in 1994, he was awarded the Fields Medal, considered the most prestigious award in the field of mathematics. Prof. Lions was the first to give and prove a complete solution to the Boltzmann equation. He currently holds the position of Chair of Partial Differential Equations and their Applications at the renowned Collège de France. Moreover, he is a member of the Académie de Sciences de Paris, and serves in many editorial and scientific committees.

Prof. Lions´ talk was an introduction to a new class of models called “Mean Field Games”. It was a striking success and attended by a large audience of more than a hundred researchers and students.

Lecture information
Date: April 24, 2012







Prof. Dr. Erwin Stein - Milestones of Direct Variational Calculus and its Analysis from the 17th Century until today – Mathematics meets Mechanics

Erwin Stein is a German professor of engineering mechanics at Leibniz-Universität Hannover. He is considered one of the founding fathers of computational mechanics.

Prof. Stein´s lecture gave a broad overview of the history of variational calculus and the development of finite element methods (FEM). He also presented a multi-scale error-controlled adaptive eXtended FEM (XFEM) method. This technique is suitable for the computation of first damage and crack nucleation of materials at the micro-scale and then crack propagation at the macro-scale.



Lecture information
Date: November 30, 2011





Prof. Dr. Endre Süli - Analytical and Computational Challenges in Navier-Stokes-Fokker-Planck Systems

The second lecture of the Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture Series was delivered on May 2, 2011 by Endre Süli, Professor of Numerical Analysis of the Mathematical Institute in Oxford University. Prof. Süli has made numerous distinguished contributions to numerical analysis of non-linear partial differential equations.

His lecture on "Analytical and Computational Challenges in Navier-Stokes-Fokker-Planck Systems" was attended by a large audience of researchers and students. The talk surveyed recent developments concerning the existence of global-in-time weak solutions to a general class of coupled microscopic-macroscopic bead-spring chain models that arise in the kinetic theory of dilute solutions of polymeric liquids with noninteracting polymer chains, and their numerical approximation. The class of models involves the unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a bounded domain for the velocity and the pressure of the fluid, with an elastic extra-stress tensor appearing on the right-hand side of the momentum equation.



Lecture information
Date: May 2, 2011





Prof. Dr. Peter Lax - Degenerate Matrices

The first guest of the Charlemagne Distinguished Lecture Series was none other than the renowned Prof. Peter Lax, who is an American mathematician and one of the dominant figures in applied mathematics in his time. Peter Lax has made deep contributions to the fields of differential equations and numerical analysis, and, among many other awards, won the Abel Prize in 2005, which is one of the highest distinctions in mathematics.

Degenerate matrices are characterized by the single equation discr[S]=0, where discr[S] is the discriminant of S. Prof. Lax presented a new proof of the proposition that the discriminant of a symmetric matrix can be represented as a sum of squares.



Lecture information
Date: October 14, 2010